Configuring OSPF – The Basics

Routing_UpdatesWe have to start somewhere so let’s look at the basics of configuring OSPF. Remember OSPF is an IGP (Interior Gateway Protocol) and allows packet authentication as well as IP multicast when sending and receiving updates. In this post we are configuring OSPF in a single area. Continue reading

Install Rancid and ViewVC on Centos 7

In this post I want to walk though the steps to install Rancid on CentOS 7 minimal. Rancid is a great tool to help monitor a device configuration for any changes. It also keeps track of them by using CVS (Concurrent Version System) for backups, so you can go back and compare versions or revert to a previous configuration. Rancid supports multiple hardware from Cisco, HP, Dell, Juniper and more. This is all open-source so you can create custom scripts or add commands to really make this a personal repository that fits your company.  During this install guide several things are required when we install Rancid, I have tired to make this as simple as possible but its not just a type and watch it install. You have to customize some of the scripts to make Rancid work like it should. Read it though and follow along.

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Setting up GNS3 1.1 on Ubuntu

gns3_logoIt’s only been a week since GNS3 1.0 was released and it’s already been updated to 1.1 so in this post I have Ubuntu 14.04 LTS with the latest updates and its time to set up GNS3. GNS3 is an open source tool that helps network professionals run a virtual network right on their computer, GNS3 is not a simulation program but rather an emulation program. So if you wanted to test a configuration change but did not want to run it on production you can run it in GNS3 instead.  This gives network professionals testing without touching any physical hardware or purchasing that expensive test lab for certification studies. Let’s get started. Continue reading

GNS3 1.0 Public is Out

gns3_logoGet your IOS, IOU, XRV, 1000v, HP, Juniper, Arista, and other images ready because that’s the beauty of GNS3, it’s here and ready to download. I’m excited for this release although the last post I did was In May of 2014, which was about getting GNS3 Alpha 3 working on Windows, you can see the full post here: GNS3 Alpha – Install and Setup. I have followed the GNS3 releases throughout the six months of them releasing Alpha and beta releases, as well as looking at changlogs of each release. So over the past six months we have seen some changes with the GNS3 team. The new logo, the new website, and of course the new 1.0 version of GNS3. They have also done a good job of setting up a new portal called the GNS3 Jungle which is for the community to ask all things networking all of which is available now. Check out all of it at http://www.gns3.com/.

Currently the GNS3 website is a little slow because I think we are all excited for the new software and can’t wait to get our hands on it but I was able to register so I’ll be posting more about the new version of GNS3 so keep that in mind, and check me out the GNS3 Jungle lewiryan.  Thanks again Stephen and Jeremy and the entire GNS3 team for building a great piece of software with the help of an awesome community. Another interesting read that I found was a post from NetworkCanuck about an Interview with Steven from GNS3, read it here: GNS3 – An Interview. So I’ll end this post with what are you loading into GNS3?

Some QoS Guidelines

When I started taking classes from the Cisco CCNA Discover books years ago, I remember for the first part of the book it talked about QoS and the theory behind it. To me QoS was a very interesting but after a chapter or two we never mentioned it again or really knew how to configure it. It seemed like it disappeared but it always something being tested on so we know it was there, somewhere… QoS can be a little boring and it does get a reputation of being difficult to understand, like where and how do I implement QoS? Most of the time QoS is not configured which causes applications to suffer in the end have an impact of end user performance. Throwing bandwidth to fix the problem is usually a costly risk, and remember you still may have the same performance problems. What also makes it interesting is you may have an environment that runs fine without QoS, so why do you need it? Well there’s no easy button to fix or find these unanswered questions about QoS. In this post I’m referencing guidelines of where to start looking which will hopefully help answer some of those unanswered questions. 🙂 Continue reading