Store-and-Forward vs. Cut-Through Switching

Switching in the network can happen in two ways, these layer-two devices send frames but they can forward them in different ways. These different modes have positive and negative effects which depend on the type of network environment that runs through them! Continue reading “Store-and-Forward vs. Cut-Through Switching”

Advertisements

The “Ending” of Layer Two Redundancy

Although layer two redundancy should never end, this is the final chapter of understanding layer two redundancy in the network. Last week I talked about how and why STP (IEEE 802.1D) is important in the network and the problems and causes of not having it which can turn your network against you and everybody on it. Today’s post will talk about how a switch decides which one is in charge on the network and which ones aren’t Continue reading “The “Ending” of Layer Two Redundancy”

The Beginnings of Layer Two Redundancy

In a perfect world we would never need redundancy on a network infrastructure, but as you know as well as I know we don’t live in a perfect world. Hardware will eventually fail, bottlenecks will appear, and the speed of our network will become slower when we max the bandwidth on links. So having redundancy in routers, connections, and having a hierarchy network is one of best choices to make when improving the efficiently of the network. But in the OSI model there is one layer that can’t have redundancy at least logically and that is Layer two of the OSI model. Continue reading “The Beginnings of Layer Two Redundancy”

Understanding VTP

Some people hate it, some people love it. It’s the Cisco proprietary VLAN Trunking Protocol (VTP) which in short means that Cisco switches can exchange VLAN configuration, instead of manually configuring each switch with the same VLANs. I also suggest if you don’t know what a VLAN is check out the post Creating VLANs Let’s get right into understanding VTP. Continue reading “Understanding VTP”