Cisco Lab Setup

When it comes to learning and getting started with Cisco there are some tools that will help out a lot like Packet Tracer, GNS3 and other emulators. These are great tools for that “simulation” of hands on learning, but you can’t always stay in that area. I find it best to get hands on with “real” Cisco Gear and so with this post I’ll go through my current setup of what I have and ask that question when it is a good time to get a lab? Just because you may want to get a lab that does not guarantee you’ll actually learn and or pass.   Continue reading

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Trunking Administrative Modes

When looking at the CCNA it is good idea to get a hold of trunking between switches along with that there are a couple of administrative modes that each physical interface on Cisco switch can be when you are trunking between them. Remember that when we are trunking it usually carries all VLANs (This can be changed) but there are different ways to make trunking between links happen. Continue reading

Configure Router on a Stick

A while ago I talked about putting different VLANs on a switch, remember a VLAN is virtual network that although physically it may look like on the same network that does not always mean the case. By having VLANs you are segmenting the network and the only way to get to the other side is having a router. I have already configured the Cisco switch as posted in Creating VLANs but in summary I have three VLANs total VLAN 1 which is the native VLAN, VLAN 2 and VLAN 3 (which is called support. If you like to understand how create VLANs on a switch follow the post above. Continue reading

The Three Tiers

Working towards the CCNA Cisco talks about a hierarchical network there are three layers to this design. Access Layer, distribution layer and the core layer. Each of them have their own set of functions and is also considered to be a best practice when the network continues to grow and for redundancy along with just a better way to manage it. Continue reading

The Beginnings of Layer Two Redundancy

In a perfect world we would never need redundancy on a network infrastructure, but as you know as well as I know we don’t live in a perfect world. Hardware will eventually fail, bottlenecks will appear, and the speed of our network will become slower when we max the bandwidth on links. So having redundancy in routers, connections, and having a hierarchy network is one of best choices to make when improving the efficiently of the network. But in the OSI model there is one layer that can’t have redundancy at least logically and that is Layer two of the OSI model. Continue reading